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Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar
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Jochen
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 9:03 am    Post subject: Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar Reply with quote

Better get started with this while things are still "pole pole" at work (I guess they haven't noticed I'm back, heehee)...

But where to start? I guess with the beginning. Nope not the 1st day... waaaay before that there was the...

1) PREPARATION.

As some of you may know, I put quite a lot of effort into preparing this trip. Where to go (paks, lodges), when to go, what to take, etc... You'll find more details on all this throughout the report, but let me start with a list of sites that proved to be helpfull:

- www.bwanamitch.com . Walter aka Bwana Mitch has the biggest Afrika portal site on the web. Through this site I found about all I was looking for, from general info down to travel guides. Thanks Walter!
- www.andybiggs.com . I knew Andy Biggs from www.dpreview.com, and knew he started a safari-business. So I got in touch with him for some very specific questions. One of those questions was about hand luggage (he's been using KLM a lot as well, so he knew all the tricks there are). Getting all camera gear in the overhead bins and not in the normal luggage compartment is important. Other questions were of course about photo gear (duh). For example, Andy was the one who pointed out the Kinésis Beanbag to me (http://kgear.com/r/). thanks andy!
- I used http://mwanasimba.online.fr/E_index.html to learen some Swahili. As I didn't buy a general guidebook (why still bother with all that geberal info? It's all on the web anyway), this site was very handy. It may look very basic, but it works!
- Verious safari forums, such as this one, and Fodors.
- Howard Hillman safari guide. Good general info, and good migration-specific info: http://www.hillmanwonders.com/safari/index.htm#_vtop
- Tanzanian Tourist board: http://tanzaniatouristboard.com/index.php
- Safari web: http://www.safariweb.com/tanzania/attract.htm
- Africa Travel Resource: http://www.africatravelresource.com/africa/E/tanzania/safariguide/T00-tanzania.htm
- African Mecca Safaris. Not as a tour operator, but they got videos of most camps & lodges on their site: http://www.africanmeccasafaris.com/safariafrica.asp
- http://www.go-safari.com/safari_Tanzania.htm. Eben & Carol got a lot of info & pics of all the lodges, and use GoogleEarth KMZ files as well. Great site. With their help, i was able to visualize my trip virtually, way before it started.

(end of list on 17/7. I might have forgotten some links so check back as I might add some more later.)
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Last edited by Jochen on Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:28 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 9:34 am    Post subject: Re: Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar Reply with quote

After having distilled a lot of info out of the above sites it was time to get down to business! First off, I decided on a period. It had to be a dry season (spotting reasons). As the winter season was more expensive, and as we already had plans for winter 2007 (Christmas & new-year will be celebrated at my parent's villa in the south of france), we decided on the summer dry season. Which is actually their "winter" over there so it seemed. I wanted a fair chance at spotting the migration, but also it became clear that we could not leave any sooner than the end of June (as one of my fellow travellers had kids who had exams at school, so she could only leave when school summer vacation started). In the end, we decided on leaving the last week of June.

Next, I chose the parks. Some skip parks. Others do them all but in a (IMHO) strange sequence. For example: they do Manyara, then Serengeti, then the crater, and then Tarangire. It appears they do this to save some money.(as they don't need any local flight back to Arusha). But I figured; the cost of that filght (about 100$) is of no comparison with rhe extra time spent on the road driving all the way back. And on top of that, taking a flight back enabled me to do the northern parks in a more logical order; starting with the most "simple" parks, and "saving the best for last". Our final itinerary; a day in Tarangire, a day in Manyara, three days in the crater and three days in Serengeti. With all the inbetween travelling included: 10 days of safari. And after that, a flight back to Arusha and then anorther 5 days in zanzibar.

Then I chose the lodges. No surprise perhaps; but again I chose the lodges not only by cost, but I also chose some for other important reasons, like having electricity to reload batteries and being in a location that minimized our time on the road.
the lodges I chose were:
- KIA lodge. We were going to arrive at Kili airport in the evening after a long day of travel. Having looked at the lodges near Arusha (more like hotels), i thought; why bother driving straight to Arusha? So KIA it was. It proved to be an excellent choice, as they agreed to also give us a "day-room" on our last day of the trip (on that day we come from Zanzibar in the morning, but the flight to Holland only leaves in the evening).
- Tarangire safari lodge. This one was near the entrance of the park. So that saves us some time on the road.
- Manyara Seronera. Close to Manyara gate. Unfortunately this one was full, even though I started planning this trip a year in advance! Finalkly it was Kirurumu tented camp. but you know what? I'm glad we weren't in Seronera, as this one looks like a small hotel. And Kirurumu, for us, was the best lodge throughout the trip. Great tents! And great location. And great food too!
- Ngorongoro Sopa. We wanted to be on the other side of the crater for a various reasons, so this was our only option. Those reasons were; a) we wanted to spend a day towards Empakai, so Sopa was excellent to minimize travel distance, and b) the road into the crater at Sopa is much better and waay less crowded in the morning.
- Ikoma tented camp. Recently being bought bu Moivaro (like KIA), the camp should have been improved (it was; you'll have more info later), and it was the only affordable camp close to where the migration should be at that moment. Note that the distance between Sopa and Ikoma is a bit too much to do in one day, so our final travel agent threw in one night at Ndutu lodge. Again an excellent choice.

You'll have more info on all the lodges as I write down the day by day details.
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Last edited by Jochen on Mon Jul 17, 2006 10:02 am; edited 1 time in total
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Jochen
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 10:01 am    Post subject: Re: Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar Reply with quote

Then I looked for a tour operator that I could trust. Well maybe most companies on the web (that are a bit known) can be trusted, but this is not a cheap trip so i wanted to make sure.

Note that us Belgians, we're still very uncertain when it comes to doing business on the web. So we'd rather deal with someone who has an office over here in Belgium, or in Holland. No problem there: there's plenty of firms that are based "over here", but provide trips "over there". Here's how I chose them:
- I stayed away from the bigger firms. Ic the ones that have a brochure that can be found at all our local travel shops. Most Belgians still book through one of these travel shops, so those "bigger safari firms" allow themselves to sell at a higher price. It's almost a bit of a monopoly thing.
- I stayed away from websites that looked too amateuristic.
In the end, I had a list of about 10 firms. I wrote to them, gave them the itinerary and wanted lodges, and asked them for a price for 4, 6, 8... persons (at that time it was still unclear how much people of our photo club would join. i wanted at least one full jeep, but perhaps there'd be é jeeps. Note that a full jeep means a slightly lower price per person.

The replies I got were very divers. Some just gave us a sample trip of their own, completely ignoring our needs (location/parks/electricity/...). One didn't even bother writing back at all. But some took our request seriously, and put a lot of effort in answering questions etc. out of these we chose two "finalists". One Dutch firm, one Belgian. We asked both these firms to confirm their prices, and at that point the Belgian firm replied that "parks xx and yy had become much more expensive" (info which I knew was absolute BS) and that in their previous offer they'd forgot to include the cost of the local flight from Serengeti to Zanzibar. Their price was all of a sudden 500€ higher that their rival's price, altough the itinerary was 100% identical. Very dissapointing!

The verdict was easy; it became www.exploretanzania.com, a company owned by Marjolijn, who has been working in TZ for quite some time before starting her own business. It proved to be an excellent choice, and we are very VERY pleased! Note that the task for ExploreTanzania was not that easy; we experienced some changes in participants along the way due to personal issues (health).

Finally there was six of us; me and my wife and four other www.xposed.be photographers.

About the other firms; I do not have the intention of putting up a "black list" here, as I know my experience with them may well be the exception to the rule. It's not because someone doesn't reply that they do this every time (my mail may have got lost). And it's not because a firm gets the price wrong in my case, that they do this every time either.

But if you want to know the names of the other firms; just let me know!
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:03 am    Post subject: Re: Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar Reply with quote

2) PACKING

Well hand luggage was easy; camera gear! We took 2 bags:
- My Lowepro fotobag, containing...
- EOS 20D
- 17-40mm L
- 35-350mm L
- 8mm peleng fish--eye
- 1,4x Teleconvertor
- 580EX flash
-... and the rest of the little holes were filled with spare batteries, chargers, universal adapter, CF cards, etc...
- A normal hand luggage bag (wheels, extendible handgrip) containing...
- 300D
- Tamron 85mm macro
- laptop
- binoculars
- field guides (see later)
- medication
- sunglasses

We barely had room for a set of spare underwear!

Our luggage were 2 bags containig typical safari clothing, toilet stuff, and plenty of socks & underwear. And two beach towels and an extra pair of shoes. We were withing weight limits (15kg/bag max), even though the toilet stuff weighed a lot (typical; you come back with less kg, as in the end the shampoo bottle or suntan lotion, etc... is used up, or left behind).

As field guides, I chose:
- The Safari Companion: A Guide to Watching African Mammals Including Hoofed Mammals, Carnivores, and Primates by Richard D. Estes.
- Birds of Kenia & Northern Tanzania by by Dale A. Zimmerman, Donald A. Turner and David J. Pearson.
They can be bought @ www.amazon.com. Both were well worth the money. What also helped a lot; I studies these books prior to leaving, and added color-coded tags to easily find the animal I was looking for.

At this time, there's also a reptiles guide: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0126564701/ref=cm_bg_d/002-1695188-2813662?v=glance&n=283155. I'm still gonna buy that one too, even though I'm already back at home.

All packed? Ready to go on safari!
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:11 am    Post subject: Re: Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar Reply with quote

Jochen wrote:
All packed? Ready to go on safari!


Oh good... I'm waiting for PHOTOS...! Wink

Paul
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 12:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Trip report - Tanzania & Zanzibar Reply with quote

DAY 00 - departure

Our plane left at about 8AM, so we were there at 6AM. Koen did not want to check in yet, as he had "something very important to tell us".

???

We got away from the crowds and sat ourselves down in the chairs of a - still closed - bar atop the departure lounge. Koen took something out of his luggage. A shoe box.

And in there; Champagne and strawberries. He said no good trip starts without Champagne. I couldn't agree more, even at 6 in the morning!

After that we attached pieces of yellow ribbon to all our luggage (normal and hand luggage). Easier this way to spot our bags on the trransport belts of all the airports. Smart!

Next; checking in! Went pretty fast. I decided to hold on to my monopod & ballhead. I mean; I could have attached it to my backpack but why bother. And if someone complained, i could still give it to the air hostess to get it back after the flight. We did the exact same thing with a wooden giraffe of 1,5m when coming back from South Africa.

Big mistake! At the last chackpoint (way past initial checkpoints, tax free zone, etc..) I ran into one of those security guys... you know the type. And if you don't; check out fotographers sites such as dpreview.com. You'll find plenty of stories about these guys. They like to mistake photographers with terrorists, and like to misuse their powers.

The fact that others had their pod with them IN the bag, and passed by just fine; didn't matter.
The fact that a couple passed by with climbing sticks (Kili climb?), and that those sticks could be used as a weapon too, just as much as my pod: didn't matter.
the fact that an old man passed by on crutches and those also are comparable: didn't matter.
Etc...

The only thing to do was to go back to check in, and have the pod checked in, without any protection. Either that, or leave it behind. Is that any choice at all?

Check-in was waaaay on the other side of the airport; inbetween was the tax-free zone, and a very long tunnel under the tarmac of a runway. I had to run both ways to make it to the plane in time. However, when arriving at the check-in, it was already deserted. Coffee break, I guess. I found a manager somewhere in the back, and he was able to help me out. He also made a call to pick up the pod and bring it to the plane. Then I ran back, and was just in time to board. Luckily, the Champagne helped a lot. Otherwise, I'd have collapsed I think.

The only thing going through my mind when I was in my seat was; how on earth is that pod gonna get here? I decided to talk to one of the orange-jacket guys that was loading all kinds of stuff (this was a small "city hopper" plane, so no problem to talk to personnel on the ground). He promised to give me a thumbs-up when the pod was delivered. Well, the passanger door was shut, the pilot started giving some details, so I was about to give up ...when all of a sudden from the door on the right pops an orange jacket ...and a thumbs up! Whew!

After a short stop in Amsterdam, we boarded the 777 to Tanzania. Private video screens, three meals, etc... all was fine. I chose two African movies to get into the mood; "Tsotsi" and "The Constant gardener". I can recommend both!!

In the evening, the sun already gone, we arrived at Kilimanjaro airport. First; customs. Pole pole! Wink You could also apply for a visa there, but I was told to do this in advance as it can take quite some time. So we did and sacrificed half a working day to get our visa from the embassy of Tanzania in Brussels.
Hmmm... from what I could tell; that was an unnecessary investment. At the airport, there was time enough to get the visa (you have to queue for customs anyway).

Then we arrived at the luggage belt ...but could not find any yellow ribbons. ALL our bags, including my monopod: NOT THERE! Aargh!

Apparently KLM screwed up and left our bags in Holland. All right... that ment more paperwork, and an extra hour at the airport. And sleeping without mosquito nets, and in the clothing we had been wearing the whole day. Also; no toothpaste & stuff. Oh well...

Next, we met our Gane & Marshall guide, David. A young guy who'd been a guide for only three years, but had been working for TTB before that. Also, we checked out the jeep. Looked exacly like we thought it would be!

He took us to KIA lodge, right next to the airport. It was already dark, so I didn't take any pictures that evening. We fell asleep very fast (long day) and heard absolutely nothing (nope, not any other planes either).
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DAY 01 - KIA, Arusha, Tarangire, Tarangire Safari lodge

OK... finally some pictures, especially for Paul. I lied a bit in previous post; I did take a picture last night. But it's just us at the bar, drinking our first Kilimanjaro beer.

At dawn, I took a pic of the rooms at KIA;



Behind the bedroom was a small storage room, and passed that a bathroom with toilet. All rooms were separate buildings, spread out in a garden. We did not have much time to check it all out, so went straight to the restaurant for the breakfast buffet. The restaurant's outer wall was all made out of glass doors and all was opened. Fresh air coming in, along with numerous birds who tried to steal as much as their beaks would allow.



the garden looked great, but it was clouded. So Kili was not visible either. Too bad. (you'll get some pics at the end of this trip report when we return to KIA)

After breakfast, we left for Arusha. First stop was a department store and a "Woolworths" clothing store. After all, we needed a minimum of supplies to cover the period until we got our luggage. But how long would we miss our luggage? One day, A week? Extra problem; Arusha was the last possibility to buy something. We decided to ope for the best; hoping our luggage would arrive that evening, or the next day. So we all bought one pair of trousers or shorts, one shirt or T-shirt, and some underwear, soap, suntan lotion etc. Two people also bought a mosquito net.

Having lost a few hours while shopping, we decided to skip the visit to Arusha, except for a stop at the ViaVia bar. A famous bar, run by Belgian people, whom we contacted a few weeks ago. We had a great chat about "living abroad". And for those who know me a bit; you can guess my ears were glowing as I plan to do the same thing somewhere in the future.

the ViaVia bar;


Soon enough, it was time to leave for Tarangire. The drive was uneventful I guess, but as it was our first day there, we enjoyed the scenery, and mount Meru, etc... at one point a huge herd of cattle crossed the road, led by Maasai, etc... We never got bored.

AFter about 1,5hrs of driving, we were at Tarangire gate. While David took care of the paperwork, we snatched our first pics. Birds mainly. The starlings with the dark blue shiny feathers (they are everywhere), and some sunbirds:



First we drove to Tarangire safari lodge (I'll post some pics of the lodge tomorrow). On our way there, we gasped at the big baobab trees.



After a quick check in (no luggage) and a quick bite to eat, we left for our first gamedrive. Itr was still partly clouded, but at least we got some sun now and then.

For Mira and me it was not our first safari, so our first animal encounters were a bit funny: every impala and zebra, even from 100M away, was photographed extensively by my fellowravelers (Koen, Tinne, Frans & Wiily), while me and Mira just relaxed and took the binoculars. The others looked at us in disbelief; how could we let those opportunities pass? Laughing

We got to see a lot, altough nothing special. Here's afew pics:













In the evening, at 6PM, we droved back to the lodge. Still no sign of our luggage. Quite normal, as it could not arrive @ KIA airport before 8PM that night. So while waiting for dinner, we enjoyed the view from the terrace of the lodge:



(notice the elephants on the right, at the river)

We had a great dinner (much better than expected again, just like previous meals), and after that most people went to sleep. But not me and Koen. We decided to go for some macro shots. Here's some of the things we found:






Nope, the last one isn't a macro. Obviously. Cool

Tomorrow; more Tarangire, then to Mto Wa Mbo and to Kirurumu tented camp!
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, thanks Jochen... is that a stick insect on the left in the penultimate shot?

Paul
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, great photos, Jochen!! Thumbs Up
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

paul wrote:
Wow, thanks Jochen... is that a stick insect on the left in the penultimate shot?

Paul


Yes it is.

And that last shot is a large spotted genet cat. We found it while waving around with our flash light. Suddenly two eyes lit up. It was right next to the path between restaurant and tents. About a dozen couplmes passed by just before we did, but none of them saw it, as they all kept their eyes (and flashlight) focussed on the pathway.

@Briggl; thanks! More coming tomorrow! Wink
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DAY 02 - Tarangire - Mto Wa Mbo - Kirurumu tented camp

OK, I promised more pics of the Tarangire safari lodge tomorrow, so here is one:



It's a wide angle shot so you can see. the edge of the cliff on the right, and our tent (Mira in front) on the left, under the baobab trees. Further in the back they had some new bungalows as well. Altough these might have had a little more comfort (some of the tent's bathrooms were a bit too "open" and did not have mosquito nets - altough ours did), they seemed far less authentic than the tents.

At breakfast, we asked if our guide had any news on our luggage. He had 2 times good news:

- He had an envelope with in there a written report, a copy of the papers we filled in at the airport etc... and a fax report proving the whole thing was sent to our travel insurance company. Great job, G&M Tours!
- Our bags had arrived, and were being transferred to the next lodge (Kirurumu) right away;

About breakfast; it was a buffet with the typical stuff: bacon and eggs (I still cannot believe the amount of eggs I ate on the whole trip!), sausages, fresh fruit, toast and marmalade, cornflakes, etc...And coffee, tea or hot coco.

Forgot to mention; other meals were very good too. Most of it was buffet (about 3 or 4 choices of dishes).

So, we left the camp, still without bags, and in the clothes we bought yesterday. On our way out, we took some great shots. Most guest were still sleeping so they might have missed the impala on the edge of the cliff next to the pathway, the hornbills in the baobab tree, and certainly the other dikdik that was resting ...right behind our tent!



It got up a little later, and limped away. Perhaps that's why it was still laying there in the first place, even though the camp was waking up. It must have been attacked by a predator. Rather smart animal actually; by staying near the camp, it may actually recover just fine I think, as there should be less predators around.

In the jeep, we talked a bit more about predators. I told our guide David that I knew about the leopard that had been shot here in Tarangire safari lodge, a few months ago. He said it was actually worse; not one, but THREE leopards were shot. The reasoning behind it; they were uncertain which of the leopards attacked the little boy, so they just shot all leopards they found, just to make sure they got the one that tasted human flesh.
I must say I wasn't too pleased to hear this. I mean; I thought that these parks were there to keep animals alive. So much for that daydream; reality is that people still have a huge negative impact on nature, even in National Parks.
Recently, Johan (fellow shooter, Botswana-freak) told me he had to sign a paper every time, saying "the tour operator cannot be held responsible, yada yada yada...". He asked me if I had to sign such a thing. I did not. But IMHO that would be the right thing. After all; we are on their turf, so... With this kind of rules, the leopards might have lived. And the people in the park would be people who are there for the right reasons; to enjoy the wildlife, but also people who are prepared to take the risk. Tip for Tanapa!

On to the gamedrive!

I was warned by Andy Biggs that animals were spread out as there's plenty of green. That proved to be true, altough things were starting to become dry by now. so we never got bored. We didn't see any big cats, but no 15 minutes went by without seeing at least some giraffe, impala, ground hornbill, zebra, baboon, hyrax, blue monkey, etc... we took some pics (again; the others more than me), but as it was overcast they are not the best.

The animals we saw most were elephants. Well, the parks known for it but David said we were rather lucky. We found small herds, including newborns, near the roads at multiple occasions. One time, we saw them coming from far away, and waited a bit. Good move! Another jeep drove off, thinking they wouldn't show (we couldn't see them any more from where we were). But patience pays off! They passed by right in front of our jeep, and started eating on the other side of the road.
One of them wasn't too happy with our presence, and started flapping his ears, lifting his trunk, etc... altough he didn't do that real "fake charge" thing. We decided to leave them at peace before it came to a charge.



One of the coolest thing we saw that morning were a tawny eagle, and some mongoose playing around on a termite hill and at the base of a tree.



Ah yes, something I should mention; I am not showing my best pics here. I got to keep those for a calendar, an expo we are putting together, and possibly even a book.

And something else about that overcast weather; ampparently it's fairly common at the beginning of this "dry season". They call it "winter"; It's rather cold (for Africa), and it doesn't rain anymore. Just a layer of clouds that dissapears throughout the day. By noon you have these little fluffy clouds and in the evening plenty of start. And the next morning; clouds again. It seems to be this way in all parks at the east side of the rift valley. The rift actually stops those clouds, so in Serengeti and the crater the pattern is rather the inverse; blue sky in the morning and clouds building up throughout the day. And in the crater yoiun sometimes see those morning clouds come over they edge, after which they disperse and eventually dissapear completely.

We ended our morning gamedrive with a full hour of sun and some good elephant pics, and a good lunch. And then we left for Mto wa Mbo.

Mto Wa Mbo is next to Manyara lake, at the entrance of Manyara NP. A small town with narrow side streets, a lot of tourist shops and a local market with vegetables, fruits and fish from the lake (that was drying in the sun).

Some great pics to be taken I guess, but I felt a little awkward photographing those poor folks. Some others did, but soon the spontaneaty (spelling? Embarassed ) was gone and salesman were all around them trying to sell all kinds of stuff.



I focussed my lens on this fellow, flying above our heads.



...and then distributed some candy and pens & stuff.

After about 30 minutes, we continued our drive to Kirurumu tented camp.

This proved to be the best camp of the whole trip! Perhaps not in comfort (as Sopa Ngorongoro is far more luxurious for example). But I found this camp to be the most authentic, perfectly fitting in the environment, with great tents with a fair amount of comfort, with great views, and with really excellent food. And the "walking safari" with a maasai that they offered (for free!) was a really nice addition.

All tents are on the left coming from the entrance, and the reastaurant & bar were on the right.



This was our tent. I think it was nr. 10, but numbering was a bit strange: no 9 was even a bit further away from the restaurant, altough no 7 was a bit closer (those were the 3 tents we had). 7, as well as 3 and 4 were on the right of the path (meaning they were lower up on the cliff than the ones on the left) and closer to the reastaurant. while no. 14 and ours were on the left and had a view on the lake that was rather obscured by trees & bushes. I remember no. 7 had a great view on the lake, but I didn't check others. Above our tent, they were constructing a new one.

This is the interior:



And this is the view from the bar, which is located below the restaurant.



That restaurant was IMHO the best we had on the mainland. No buffet here (except at breakfast), but a 3 or 4 course menu with 2 options for main dish. But it tasted absolutely great! I dunno what (famous?) chef cooks there, but I hereby like to compliment him on doing such a great job!

oih yes; by night, there's alot of frogs croaking near the restaurant. Sometimes so loud you can barely understand each other! Now that's what I call dining in a natural environment! I hope the cook never ever puts frog legs on the menu!

There's this little pool right next to it, and there's where i found them:



Coming up; Ngorongoro crater, and Sopa. And a mysterious encounter.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Jochen... another great read.

Sad about the leopards... Crying or Very sad
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent !!!!

Great pictures and a very well-written story - it`s fun reading it during my midday-break at work Very Happy

Looking forward to day 3 Cool
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, keep it coming, Jochen!! Super Thread
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Some great pics to be taken I guess, but I felt a little awkward photographing those poor folks

Yeah, I feel really bad trying to take these shots.

It's the big advantage of compact digital cameras with LCD viewfinders, you can take photos discretely without anyone knowing.

Previously, I avoided what would have been some really great shots because I didn't want to embarrass (them or me) or to attract the sharks.
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